MEDIA RELEASE - LADIES, CHECK YOUR BREASTS - 31 JULY 2020

PETA MURPHY MP
MEMBER FOR DUNKLEY

 

LADIES, CHECK YOUR BREASTS

The number of women who have had breast cancer detected early has dropped by 37% during the coronavirus pandemic.

This isn’t good news.

Experts are convinced that fewer women have been leaving home to get tested and that some women may have been ignoring important symptoms because of other stressors during this time. At a time where people are going through financial and employment stress, juggling the needs of their children, families and friends, and their lives have been upended by social restrictions, many women are looking after everyone else other than themselves.

Data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare estimated the number of new cases of breast cancer diagnosed in 2020 would be approximately 20,000.

The 37% drop in early detection could mean that up to 8,000 women have breast cancer right now but do not know it. Early detection is an important part of Australia’s excellent survival rate.

Federal Member for Dunkley Peta Murphy MP is using her own cancer experience to call on Australian women to listen to their bodies and get tested.

“Ladies, check your breasts. It’s not only safe to visit your GP or the screening clinic, it’s essential,” Ms Murphy said.

“As someone who has been diagnosed with breast cancer twice, I know how important it is to get checked. Getting checked early saved my life."

“Women, its time to put your health first, COVID-19 is not an excuse to ignore your body and not get tested. If you have any symptom of breast cancer the message is simple - please get tested.”

Common symptoms of breast cancer can include:

  • a change in the size or shape of your breasts;
  • a change to the nipple such as crusting, redness;
  • a nipple discharge (liquid) that occurs without squeezing;
  • a new lump or lumpiness, especially if it’s only in one breast;
  • a change in the skin, such as puckering or dimpling (like orange peel);
  • your nipple becoming inverted (or pulled in); and
  • an unusual pain that does not go away.

Contact your local GP and book an appointment. For breast screening locations and more information visit www.bcna.org.au.

 

DATE: 31 JULY 2020

MEDIA CONTACT: DYLAN STEED 0400 615 862

Authorised by Paul Erickson, ALP, Canberra.